Tag Archives: TowerPoint

Headin’ east

It’s time for us to turn eastward once again.  Tough to do, we’ll miss our Towerpoint and ham radio friends and all the great tennis and social events.  Duty calls and, hopefully, fair Florida weather will be welcoming too.

Friends from Calgary, JIm and Martha, were on an easterly course for Tallahassee FL from Las Vegas.  They arrived Wednesday afternoon at Towerpoint for a brief visit before they resumed their trip.  They’ll be joining an Airstream caravan about Florida a few days from now.  Our planned departure from Mesa was Thursday morning, a half day behind them.

Our travels have previously been altered by thunderstorms and snowstorms but this is the first time we’ve delayed a departure.  Thursday’s forecast for our trip’s first leg called for 3 to 11 degrees (Fahrenheit) overnight and snow and high temperatures in the high teens.  Our previous trip from Mesa to the east (Dec 2009) was so fast-paced we dedicated ourselves this time to planning an extra two days into the itinerary.  We looked at this weather outlook and dispensed with one of our zero days.  The weather would be better one day later.

We mentioned the weather outlook to Jim and Martha and they decided to wait their departure until Friday morning because the trip’s overnights would be too chilly.  They gained a relaxing Wednesday afternoon and all day Thursday in Mesa.  We joined Bob and Faith for a farewell celebration at Organ Stop Pizza .

Organ Stop is a must-see in Mesa, it has the world’s largest Wurlitzer organ complete with 23 ranks and an entire set of 32 feet long wood pipes. Wonderful organists do a wonderful job showcasing the organ by playing several sets of tunes including requests from customers.  We all enjoyed good pizza, salad, and wonderful music at Organ Stop Pizza.

The evening was still young and across the street is Pros Ranch Market, the largest Mexican grocery store we’ve visited.  Panederia, salsa bar, tortilleria, taqueria, cremeria, carniceria, and all sorts of produce we’d never seen are presented in colorful and appealing displays.  The sweet rolls and cookies are really tempting, the fresh tamales are excellent, the salsas are fresh and fantastic, and if we can catch the store with short check-out lines we enjoy sampling treats from Pros Ranch.

Towerpoint Resort’s gate guard welcomed us to a completely and very dark resort.  Colder than usual temperatures greatly increased electrical demand throughout the east valley and wreaked havoc with the local utility’s power distribution plan.  Rolling blackouts ensued and the resort’s power did not successfully reconnect.  People in some sections of the resort spent  several days without power.  Thursday evening everyone apparently was “in the dark” from before 2100 hours until sometime after 0400 hours.

It’s nice to wake up to full power.  And even nicer is our fully self-contained home.  Regardless of local utility power issues our batteries power lights, heat, fans, and  electronics.  Unfortunately for our park model (mobile home) neighbors their lights and heat are completely dependent upon local utility electrical power.  A few have gas furnaces, but their gas furnaces require 110vac to drive the fans and controls, whereas our furnace is battery-powered.

Good news is on the horizon for Towerpoint folks — their weather forecast is for 70 degrees by Super Bowl Sunday.  Wish we were there!  We have had a wonderful winter in Towerpoint with friends on and off the tennis court, and our Mesa weather overall was fabulous.  No matter how cool the temperatures the hot tubs were still steamy hot and it’s never too cold to play tennis.  Several of us gathered for a couple hours of tennis Thursday morning.  The captains had cancelled our inter-resort league match due to cold temperatures.  Our friendly game, an hour later, was very nice in sub-40 degree temperatures.

Our first travel day we left Mesa at 0530 hours caravanning with Jim and Martha.  We arrived almost fourteen hours later in chilly (27F) Fort Stockton TX.  Saturday morning we left at 0630 hours and drove just past Houston — at 545 miles a much shorter drive than Friday.  Houston is much warmer than Fort Stockton, we arrived to 60 degrees.  Sunday and Monday we’ll also have 400 mile drives, weather permitting.  We’re heading for Orlando FL for Hamcation, the best hamfest in the southeast.

We’ve been “out west” since June 2010, it’s time to head east again.  Even as much as we’ll miss everything western, the food, the weather, tennis, and especially friends, we have family and friends and doin’s back east.  And hopefully we can find our way westward later this year.

[Sorry no pictures this time — posting on the road with battery power only, glad to get the alphabet on this post.  Will post pictures of Organ Stop party later.]

See you down the road!

Jim and Debbie

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©2007-2011 Dreamstreamr

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Dreamstreamr’s Best of 2010 — a short personal list

2010 was one of our best years in many ways.  We haven’t had a bad one, mind you.  We realized today we started Airstreaming seven years ago this year.  Four of the less than seven we’ve been full-time in our 25′ Airstream travel trailer.  All four years have been wonderful, exciting, different and often surprising.

What made 2010 great and different? A thumbnail sketch includes these things:

  • participating in a WBCCI Airstream caravan;
  • staying a month in Gillette;
  • visiting the oldest hamfest in the world;
  • visits to over a dozen national parks (and we’ll try to narrow it down to the best one;)
  • fun in Vancouver with our granddaughter;
  • three weeks volunteering with NOMADS, a United Methodist mission;
  • making a couple of smart purchases; and
  • stays at a wonderful pair of resorts.

Rainbow Bridge

We spent six wonderful weeks touring America’s southwest on a WBCCI Airstream caravan led by our friends Jay and Elna Thompson and Winston and Carol Montague. We were delighted to gain precious friendships with couples we hadn’t already met before the caravan while deepening our relationships with those we traveled with before.  And the six-week

Mule ride thru Bryce Canyon

guided tour throughout our country’s southwest was wonderful.  Our caravan leaders arranged tours, boat rides, and other special treats we either would have missed by scrimping or just wouldn’t have known about on our own.  Too, we enjoyed the company of many friends while trying to absorb the wonders in six weeks of sightseeing.

A month in Gillette WY allowed us time to really mine the area, so to speak.  We  toured one of their incredible and gigantic coal mining operations — nothing at all like the media makes it out; eat wonderful bison rib eye steaks at The Open Range Restaurant in Wright WY; tour the Wyodak air-cooled electrical generation plant;walk downtown Gillette; play tennis in Campbell County’s

That's a big pickup

incomparable municipal recreation center;  join the local ham radio club for breakfast at Granny’s Kitchen; browse and restock on electronic parts and custom cables from Chris Supply; participate in amateur radio’s annual Field Day with our WBCCI Amateur Radio Club; enjoy terrific convention management by the CAMPLEX staff; and celebrate another successful annual Airstream WBCCI rally.  We had a great month in Gillette!

best place for a hamfest

More than two years ago Dave Blum kf4gtj (SK) and Jim wanted to briefly slip away from our Airstream caravan’s tours for a look at the oldest continuously running hamfest in the world, the Glacier-Waterton International Peace Park Hamfest.  Dave and Jim didn’t make it then but it remained on their bucket list.  We (Jim and Debbie) put it on our agenda for 2010 and enjoyed a week in East Glacier with the best international group of hams we’ve been with.  Great weather, great scenery, great radio folks — This was a fine week.

North Rim Lodge

Debbie and Jim are divided on which was the best National Park we visited — North Rim of Grand Canyon, or Zion, or Mesa Verde.  We visited probably at least a dozen throughout 2010.  These three were our clear favorites for the year, and all were stupendous for roughly similar reasons.

Cliff Palace, Mesa Verde

Mesa Verde wins out for being the least crowded and still providing stunning history and scenery. Zion has incomparable hikes and public transit and a very accessible but separate town site.  North Rim gave us an inch of overnight snowfall, very nice days, such a great old lodge, and more views than we ever could have imagined.  How do you pick one best one?

Cradlepoint router

Hands down, no equivocating, our best purchase for the year is our Cradlepoint CTR-500.  Our Airstream trailer is a mobile WIFI hotspot and we are radioactive!  Okay, only figuratively, but for us nothing beats the convenience of our own mobile wifi network.  We work three laptops, an iPad, and an iPod Touch.  Friend Bob Simms highly recommended the Cradlepoint to us, and we owe him many megabytes for our happiness with local wifi.  All devices tune effortlessly and quickly to the wifi, the Cradlepoint can support up to 32 devices at a time (but please don’t ask us to share, okay?), and we don’t mess with VZ Access anymore.  Wifi is good.

We don’t usually stay in resorts, national or state or provincial parks are more our speed.  But several years we have stayed in two resorts, one in British Columbia and the other in Mesa AZ.  Burnaby Cariboo RV Resort 17 km east of Vancouver BC is really really nice.  But Towerpoint Resort in Mesa has it beat hands-down.  Towerpoint is a  premiere tennis resort with five gorgeous hard courts, two hot tubs, two swimming pools, and too many excellent facilities to mention.  If we weren’t tennis players, we’d find plenty else to occupy us at Towerpoint.  And the people are wonderfully friendly and supportive.  Towerpoint is clearly the best resort we visited last year and we look forward to many more visits.

building a shed at Ocean Park Retreat

The best short description for our past year is “active”.  We saw a lot, participated in a lot of guided tours, hiked and toured many places, volunteered three weeks at Ocean Park Retreat on Washington state’s coast on mission work with NOMADS, played tennis all winter in Mesa AZ — we had an active year.  Yet we moved fewer times, stayed longer in places.  Three months in Okeechobee FL, a month in Gillette WY, five weeks on Washington state’s coast, three months in Mesa AZ.

We might be getting the hang of this full-timing thing, living throughout the continent.  Life on the road as full-timers, as a recent responder reminds us, isn’t vacation — it’s life (thanks, Sue, for the excellent phrase) on the road.  Our house has wheels, but it doesn’t require constant rolling.  We can stay in one place awhile if we want. We’re enjoying our environs more as we dig a little deeper in each locale.

You’ve absorbed all you can in one reading — we’ll save some highlights from last year for another day.

Jim and Debbie

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©2007-2011 Dreamstreamr

Odds and Ends

We voted last week.  Picked up absentee ballot from our mailbox and realized we had zero days to deadline to get this in the mail and on the way to NC.  Our first time to do this, we’d always been home to vote before and relied on local newspaper for sample ballot and our research.

This time we studied the candidates electronically with great assistance from a voting info page sponsored by one of the universities.

A sign I’m back into my rhythm — three days in a row I’ve enjoyed my cup of matcha tea on our patio by 06:00 a.m.  It makes me feel great to watch the sun rise (closer to 06:50), to breathe the clean morning air, hear the morning noises of a busy city street, sip the rich tea, and read just one scene from a play or one small chapter of a slow book.  Except this morning I spent adding to these paragraphs and my next post.

We were moving around and committed to other things for the previous six weeks.  I might not have had but one sunrise cup of tea.  Didn’t even get out of bed until after 7 or 8 or even later a few times.  Well yeah, those times I stayed up until after 01:00 in the morning and am not too likely to get up right away.

I like this groove better.  Quiet time, just a little niche in the day, to get my my bearings.

Found the sole general delivery Mesa Post Office last week for our forwarded mail.  Mesa has maybe a dozen contract postal units (CPUs) serving their respective resorts like this one and several branch post offices in Mesa. We learned last year the branch post offices won’t handle general delivery mail.  Most folks staying in these many resorts simply get their mail through their CPU.  We receive a key from the resort for our mailbox, and the CPU stuffs whatever arrives (plus a generous helping of junk mail) into our box for us.

Our mail would go from the forwarding agency (Escapees) to the local post office, and then to the CPU for our resort.  But last year one of our forwarded packets disappeared.  The CPU lacks a scanner and so cannot account for what the Post Office does, and does not, transfer to the CPU.  Our packet left Escapees and the Post Office scanned it successively throughout its journey until it left the local Post Office.  Did the CPU get it?  We’ll never know.

This year we’ll use General Delivery instead of the resort’s CPU.   We pick up our mail every week or two directly from the post office.  The post office retains secure chain of custody on our package until we pick it up ourselves, at which time the post office scans it out as delivered.  Safe and sure.

Finally turned on the AC, it was 92 outside in the shade and we’re parked in full sun.  Mornings were 60 degrees, really nice for sitting outside.  I’m back to an old habit, making a cup of matcha and reading a chapter at sunrise.  Sort of symbolizes return to routine for me.  But this week the morning lows are high 40s, a little chillier.

Seems funny to have the air on and still turn off the converter to save electricity.  But the solar panels are more than capable, with all this sunlight, of maintaining the batteries throughout all the day’s use.  Why pay for more kwh?

We’re running the lights and fans and fridge controls and phantom (okay, all the battery loads) with solar charging only.  This is an experiment, to see how well it works and for how many (if any) weeks we can do this as the sun gets lower and lower in the sky.  Our solar panels aren’t yet tiltable but I’d like to correct this — maybe I can get to it in the next couple of months?

Jim and Debbie

locate us here
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©2007-2010 Dreamstreamr

Six weeks is a long time to stay

It hasn’t seemed so long, but we’d been in Mesa six weeks yesterday. We did have a feeling we’d been here awhile — we’ve both been getting itchy feet for the last week or two. So we started making lists to help get us ready for departure.

That’s right, we’re checking our list carefully before we head back East. We’d hate to get a couple of thousand miles down the road and then realize we left something behind, like the RV. These things are avoidable, you know?

We both are list-makers for any number of purposes. We’ve been accused of being extremely linear (I think it meant I always added 1 + 2 before I did anything to 3). You could, at any given time in our RV, find a couple of active to-do lists and a grocery list (for the things we didn’t find and the things we’ve since discovered we wanted).

We have a pre-flight list of things we’ll do before we leave Mesa. The big things are arranging the radio antennae for the trip, programming the amateur radios for enroute repeaters, setting tire pressures for all eight tires for highway driving, dumping the RV’s two holding tanks, securing all loose items in the RV, donating clothes to local Charity, and getting groceries for the 2,300 mile ride.

We have only a couple of loose ends with the resort park office, like turning in our mailbox key, paying our electric bill, submitting the mail forwarding request. Jim has one more tennis match tomorrow morning. Deb wants to play tennis one more time before we leave.

We’d love to get the truck (and maybe the Airstream) cleaned up before the drive. Clean windows, floor mats, and a clean hood are all we really need — we can’t see the rest of the truck from our truck’s seats anyway. And it’s nice to at least clean the windows and door on the Airstream, if we can’t get it all washed before we leave.

We’re facing a long four days, or we may take a fifth day, for the 2,300 miles from Mesa, TX, to Kannapolis, NC. Yet we’re looking forward to the drive, the scenery, the change. And we’re especially excited about returning to green North Carolina.

Mesa, and Towerpoint particularly, has been wonderful. We enjoyed so much here, from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesen West to Scottsdale’s Old Town and the Sugar Bowl; desert hiking with friends from Towerpoint and visiting Tempe; finding our way around vast metropolitan Phoenix; playing tennis every day and having nice soaks in the park’s hot tubs.

We’ll miss the tennis club facilities and people, just 100 yards from our RV. We’ll miss the interesting and changing desert weather. We’ll miss our Towerpoint friends and our fun times with them. We’ll look forward to another season here, another time. Now it is time for us to go.

Let’s go somewhere. Six weeks is a long time to stay.

Jim and Debbie
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©2009 Dreamstreamr

We’re on Holiday, we’ll write when we return

Yeah, we’ve been on vacation for weeks — can’t you tell? Upon arriving at Towerpoint Resort in Mesa, AZ, our life suddenly took a busy turn. So busy, in fact, we quickly resorted to Google Calendar to organize and track our plans. We still get Sundays off after church service, although it’s fun to play ping-pong Sunday evenings at the resort pavilion. The other eight days a week we are playing tennis, hiking, walking, touring the area — almost anything except sitting around.

We’re sightseeing more than we anticipated in our short visit to this area. We thought a month would pass so quickly we would just get a little orientation to Mesa and not really spread our wings at all. Close to true but we’ve done more than we expected. First, we extended our stay from four weeks to six weeks. Second, Jim’s brother, Chuck, flew in from North Carolina and invited us to join him and our nephew, Tom, for our first visit to Taliesen. I’ll talk more about this in a minute.

Same day we joined Chuck and Tom for a visit to In-N-Out Burger, a sort of southwest hamburger chain with maybe two hundred locations. We are proud of them, they only do hamburgers, cheeseburgers, fries, pop, and shakes. No extended menus here — way to go! A big however, however, we were disappointed they don’t even talk chili (did you ask for chili peppers, ma’am?) and slaw (slaw? what?). Okay, we’re still from back east or, as they say around here, “out east”.

Los Olivos Restaurant

Debbie outside Los Olivos Restaurant

We next toured downtown old Scottsdale. Old is a funny term for something invented in the 1950’s, don’t you think? I know, I know, Scottsdale was supposedly founded by Hohokam as early as 800 AD. They left around 600 years later, and Frank Lloyd Wright next showed up in the nearby McDowell Mountains almost 530 years later. And still Scottsdale was almost nothing before the 1950s.

The Sugar Bowl

The Sugar Bowl

One “early” institution of Scottsdale is The Sugar Bowl. We had scarcely exhausted our burgers and fries but had to treat ourselves to a visit to The Sugar Bowl. If you’re like us you’ve been introduced to The Sugar Bowl in Scottsdale without realizing it. Bil Keane somewhat regularly includes it in his comic strip, Family Circus. We enjoyed sundaes and a great cup of coffee before striking out again for our walking tour of “old Scottsdale”. But we could have spent this time writing on our blog, eh?

Canyon Lakes hike

Canyon Lakes hike

We’ve had two great hikes in the Superstition Mountains area with another planned for this weekend. Towerpoint Resort has several hiking clubs and it’s easy to hook up with a group for one day or another of hikes. We appreciate Bill and Diana leading the hikes on Saturdays, we wouldn’t know where to go without them. The hikes have been approximately seven miles at a fairly easy pace, and the weather has been fabulous.

FLLW's office

FLLW's office

Our visit to Taliesen was so nice we decided to go again a few days ago. We took a longer tour, for three hours, for more details on the campus, the architectural school, and the history. This was fabulous for us. Some of the information was a repeat of our “Insights” 90 minute tour. The “Behind The Scenes” tour was better all around. We like our tour leader’s presentation better. She seemed to understand her information and deliver it better. And we enjoyed sitting in the Taliesen dining room for tea and pastries as we listened to a Taliesen Senior Fellow, Polly, describe life and work under Frank Lloyd Wright’s direction.

When we’re sitting around, not reading, we’re playing home designer. Our second visit to Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesen West included a fun and lengthy visit to the bookstore. We pored for two hours over the large array of books and awarded ourselves an early Christmas present of the Frank Lloyd Wright Companion in cd format. This is perfect for us in several ways.

The book is a collection of a huge number of FLLW’s works. His works are described in text, portrayed in pictures, and defined in graphic floorplan. We sit for hours sifting through many of his house plans.
“What do you like about this one?” ”
Could we build this one, and with what changes?”
“Do you like anything about this one?”
“Is this one too large?”

We’re enjoying pretending we’re designing our home, and enjoying the amazing possibilities for a 1,000 SF home. But we could have spent this time writing on our blog, eh?

The Sprites

The Sprites

Who knew George Vanderbilt had a hotel in Arizona? Actually he didn’t, but it is named the Biltmore nonetheless. We had a nice time visiting one evening on our own. Pretty nice place, even if you aren’t spending any money. Frank Lloyd Wright was the consulting architect on this project, and his influence shines through delightfully. It was fun to learn of his use of Sprites in some projects, and we enjoyed a relaxing evening walking the grounds and the lobbies.

iHouse interior

iHouse interior

Clayton Homes has recently added an iHouse model in Mesa, AZ. You may remember we wrote two months ago about our first visit to an iHouse, in Everett, Washington. We could have described it as “the house we’re looking for, if we’re looking for one.” But we’re not ready to buy a house since we don’t know where to put it. Shopping is all the fun anyway, and we had a lot of fun visiting the iHouse in Mesa a few weeks ago and again yesterday.

Thanksgiving dinner

Thanksgiving dinner

What else have we been up to? We had a great Thanksgiving with Jim’s brother’s brother-in-law. David put on a huge spread for family and friends and we are fortunate we could celebrate Thanksgiving with them. We left David’s to drive back to our home and couldn’t find a single game on television. You already know this but we didn’t realize Monday night football (and Thanksgiving football too, it seemed) aren’t on network broadcast television any longer. Is this correct? And if it is, why is it right? Okay, I’m done ranting.

Finally, we’re catching up on our periodicals, a little, in between visits to the tennis courts. You can never really get ahead of them. Hundreds of people are at work all day and night, somewhere, putting together and publishing magazines full of junk. We pay to have almost a dozen magazines sent to us every month. Read one every two days and we’re staying even. But it takes us each a day or two, at least, to get through them because we don’t read magazines for more than a couple of hours a day. Every week we read the entire Sunday newspaper after church and don’t even get to a magazine. And we were behind to start with — so we’re packing a couple dozen magazines at all times around here.

As Barry pointed out in a comment yesterday, we’ve obviously not been putting the needed time into writing. And not because there is a dearth of material here. We could write two times a day, there’s so much to tell. We could write about the variety of Christmas decorations going up on the little park models (mobile homes) throughout the Resort. We can write about the sharp increase in population in the resort as December starts. Or we could write about our resistance to the holiday music starting already at the Resort’s pavilion since Thanksgiving.

Better, we could write about the sweet sights and sounds of life in Paradise. The sun is setting and from our house we can see pink clouds and skies all around us, punctuated with fifty feet tall palm trees softly swaying in the breeze. We have an almost constant symphony of small aircraft softly humming their distinctive notes overhead enroute to or from Falcon Field nearby. Throughout every day we have the clearly sensible temperature rise, peak, and decline as the temperature follows closely the sun’s effect on our little neighborhood.

No promises about any writing. Although we greatly enjoy writing and have a lot of fun reading your comments, we’ve hit a temporary new Mesa mode. We’re thoroughly sucked into the Resort’s tennis club and enjoying every minute of it. We’re enjoying fantastic (if very dry — can you spell dewpoint of 7 degrees F?) weather and new friends, and a very different place. We’re tasting some new foods, or perhaps just old foods much hotter than we’ve experienced before. And we’re making the most of this before we head back east for Christmas and then down to south Florida for Q1 2010.

Sunny greetings from Mesa — We’re on Holiday, and will write when we return. Thanks for waiting patiently as we think about (and experience) what to write. Or, maybe we’re just on the tennis courts . . .

See you down the blog!

Jim and Debbie
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©2009 Dreamstreamr

Heavy RFI in Mesa

Radio Frequency Interference, or RFI, is a well-known and much documented problem. RFI hopefully is less common and disruptive than in the old days of amateur radio. Modern amateur radio equipment stays more tightly on frequency and is easier to tune. Modern television and radios are superior to the old ones at discriminating unwanted signal and receiving the desired stations. Why, then, an article now about RFI in Mesa?

We have discovered a pervasive source of RFI in TowerPoint Community in Mesa. The effect seems very strong and widespread throughout this community of over 1,000 people. We wonder it hasn’t been reported, but our research shows no notices on the RFI from in or near this Resort.

N4RTG Debbie and N5RTG Jim have been here eight days. These eight days have seen no (absolutely ZERO) participation by either of us on the regional or national ham radio nets. The week before we arrived to TowerPoint we were daily checking in on the 20 meter RV Service Nets (networks of home-based and mobile ham radio operators checking in and reporting on location, weather, health, and travel plans) out of Minnesota and Tennessee, and the 40 meter Pacific RV Service Nets from Longview, Washington and points in California. We cannot get on the nets due to the interference.

We were able, after just a little consideration and without any fox-hunting, to locate the source of the radio frequency interference. The answer should not have surprised us. Our good friend, W7IRY Bob, warned us of the likely interference problem before we arrived. Some things don’t go away even if you ignore them.

We have spent time, every morning and afternoon, at the TowerPoint Tennis Club. Our morning starts there before breakfast at 0700 hours when we hit for part of an hour before the Club activities consume all the courts. After breakfast we return to the courts to watch competition or team practices.

Monday (yesterday) we spent from 0645 hours until almost 1300 hours (over six hours) playing and watching. It was Jim’s first competition in two decades. He was paired with John H, a classy and very experienced player. They were facing a dynamic duo from a neighboring Resort and, the word was, the duo were undefeated last year. At least Jim would have some good experience from the match, even with the loss.

Jim and John played great together and hit a lot of good shots. Their very worthy opponents lost despite their good play and great chip lobs. Jim and John are looking forward to another match next week and many more over the next winters here. After their match, they grabbed some snacks from the Club kitchen and we watched the remainder of the Men’s and Women’s 3.5 League matches (our team won 12-5 against ViewPoint Resort).

Jim walked back to the courts yesterday late and watched another of the Resort’s teams practicing. He helped shag balls for the team captain and instructor so they could spend more time coaching. We are parked so close to the courts it is hard not to wander over and pick up a game or just watch.

This is a great tennis community with wonderful facilities and people. We’re enjoying more tennis at TowerPoint than we’ve had in many years. Which brings us back to the radio frequency interference.

Our ham radios are mobile, which means they are in our truck and rolling home. We can’t operate HF to reach the regional and national RV Service radio Nets from the tennis courts. Even if we could, we shouldn’t. All this great tennis is interfering considerably and frequently with our ham radio receiving and transmitting. If this isn’t a clear case of radio frequency interference, I’ll eat my hat with the callsign on it.

W7IRY calls the effect “the great sucking sound” of an activity pulling someone in completely. We were duly warned and have no one to blame. Nor would we. We’re having a great time, meeting lots of wonderful people, and getting much more physical activity than we might otherwise have taken. Thanks to the TowerPoint Tennis Club!

Jim and Debbie
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©2009 Dreamstreamr