Six weeks is a long time to stay

It hasn’t seemed so long, but we’d been in Mesa six weeks yesterday. We did have a feeling we’d been here awhile — we’ve both been getting itchy feet for the last week or two. So we started making lists to help get us ready for departure.

That’s right, we’re checking our list carefully before we head back East. We’d hate to get a couple of thousand miles down the road and then realize we left something behind, like the RV. These things are avoidable, you know?

We both are list-makers for any number of purposes. We’ve been accused of being extremely linear (I think it meant I always added 1 + 2 before I did anything to 3). You could, at any given time in our RV, find a couple of active to-do lists and a grocery list (for the things we didn’t find and the things we’ve since discovered we wanted).

We have a pre-flight list of things we’ll do before we leave Mesa. The big things are arranging the radio antennae for the trip, programming the amateur radios for enroute repeaters, setting tire pressures for all eight tires for highway driving, dumping the RV’s two holding tanks, securing all loose items in the RV, donating clothes to local Charity, and getting groceries for the 2,300 mile ride.

We have only a couple of loose ends with the resort park office, like turning in our mailbox key, paying our electric bill, submitting the mail forwarding request. Jim has one more tennis match tomorrow morning. Deb wants to play tennis one more time before we leave.

We’d love to get the truck (and maybe the Airstream) cleaned up before the drive. Clean windows, floor mats, and a clean hood are all we really need — we can’t see the rest of the truck from our truck’s seats anyway. And it’s nice to at least clean the windows and door on the Airstream, if we can’t get it all washed before we leave.

We’re facing a long four days, or we may take a fifth day, for the 2,300 miles from Mesa, TX, to Kannapolis, NC. Yet we’re looking forward to the drive, the scenery, the change. And we’re especially excited about returning to green North Carolina.

Mesa, and Towerpoint particularly, has been wonderful. We enjoyed so much here, from Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesen West to Scottsdale’s Old Town and the Sugar Bowl; desert hiking with friends from Towerpoint and visiting Tempe; finding our way around vast metropolitan Phoenix; playing tennis every day and having nice soaks in the park’s hot tubs.

We’ll miss the tennis club facilities and people, just 100 yards from our RV. We’ll miss the interesting and changing desert weather. We’ll miss our Towerpoint friends and our fun times with them. We’ll look forward to another season here, another time. Now it is time for us to go.

Let’s go somewhere. Six weeks is a long time to stay.

Jim and Debbie
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2 responses to “Six weeks is a long time to stay

  1. Three excellent posts!!
    Those of us who are still bound with the ball and chain can learn from your experiences, and the mail post was a good one.

    Tire pressures are a matter of experience for me, but I understand where you are coming from by weighing the trailer and going from there. I have always run at the maximum of 65 psi, and the tires are wearing evenly. Our configuration is different, and we may even be at the weight correct for our trailer. I think I read where Airstream at Jackson Center has a new scale that can weigh either side and even each tire. When you are in the vicinity……

    I read about your road of terror episode in the new Airstream Life magazine!!! Remind me not to make the same mistake.

    Youall have a wonderful trip across the country to ‘home’ and family.

    See you down the road.

    • Barry,
      You are so right — the tire answer may be different for everyone. THANKS for sharing about the weight scales at Airstream Factory. We’d heard some places to weigh individual wheels but had not encountered one. Airstream Factory is a stop we try to make every year.

      I look forward to finding out how far out of whack our loading is. Or maybe, by design, all the stuff balances just right because of placement of the fridge, pantry, and other storage spots.

      Thanks for your great comments,

      Jim

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